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Local lawyer offers support during US travel ban

Alycia Douglass

Published on February 8, 2017

Gordan Campbell, of Aubry Campbell Maclean Law Firm has recently offered to provide free legal services to those affected by the US travel bans.

CORNWALL, Ontario - In the wake of President Donald Trump's travel ban, local lawyer, Gordon Scott Campbell has recently promised to provide free legal counsel to those impacted by the ban.

The ban, which was proposed last month, is expected to prevent seven Muslim-majority countries from entering the US for 90 days, including Iraq, Syria, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan and Yemen. The executive order also paused refugee admissions into the US for 120 days, while completely denying entry to Syrian refugees.

In attempts to pacify some of the current global issues, Campbell took to twitter with a remarkable proposition, stating that for the next 90 days, he would be offering free immigration law consults to anyone affected by the current travel ban. “Being about the only immigration lawyer in these parts, I felt a sort of moral responsibility to help,” said Campbell.

The tweet generated an international response, with people reaching out from the seven affected countries, as well as the United States. “We’ve certainly had a lot more inquiries lately,” said Campbell. “I’ve received quite a few emails from people in the United States concerned about their status, and how long it may last.”

While the responses were mostly positive, some were concerned about the pressing nature of more local issues. “Many Canadians have concerns regarding immigration,” said Campbell. “In terms of the resources they bring, we have to admit that this is fundamentally critical to our country, and is necessary to solve other issues.”

The promised consultations will allow Campbell to review the client’s background in detail, which would normally come at a cost. “For the next 90 days, we’re willing to waive these fees with individuals,” said Campbell. “The purpose is to explore the ways people can legally come to Canada.”

Campbell says it’s a matter of connecting with people and helping them to realize their options.

“There’s a warm feeling when people respond positively to this kind of thing,” said Campbell.

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